The Critical Role of Islands for Waterbird Breeding and Foraging Habitat in Managed Ponds of the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project, South San Francisco Bay, California

The South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project aims to restore 50–90 percent of former salt evaporation ponds into tidal marsh in South San Francisco Bay, California. However, large numbers of waterbirds use these ponds annually as nesting and foraging habitat.

Establishing baseline conditions to inform adaptive management of South San Francisco Bay salt ponds: A comparison of waterbird abundance from the 1980s to the 2000s

The 30,000 acres of wetlands within the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) provide critical habitat for over one million waterbirds annually (Page et al. 1999, Warnock et al. 2002). These wetlands consist largely of tidal marshes and open water ponds.

The South Bay Mercury Project: Using Biosentinels to Monitor Effects of Wetland Restoration for the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project

The South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project plans to convert 50-90% of the former salt evaporation ponds of South San Francisco Bay into tidal marsh habitat. This large-scale habitat restoration may change the distribution, bioavailability, and bioaccumulation of methylmercury.